Common Faults: Missing Power Position

Correct Power Position: Torso vertical, knees/hips slightly bent, feet still flat on the floor, and the bar in the hip.

Correct Power Position: Torso vertical, knees/hips slightly bent, feet still flat on the floor, and the bar in the hip.

The power position is the most important position in the snatch and clean. It is the start of the second pull, and is where the bar will reach its highest speeds and where it is given its direction. When the power position is missed this will without a doubt effect the amount of power that can be put into the bar and it's direction.

Common reasons for missing the power position are: an improper first pull, attempting to lift the bar with the arms instead of the legs/hips, and pushing the hips forward instead of "jumping" the hips up. 

Corrections will be anything that allows the lifter to feel or strengthen the correct positions. Some examples are:

  • Snatch or Clean Jumps (jump and land drill with a bar in the power position)
  • Power Position Snatch or Hip Clean
  • Mid-thigh Snatch or Clean
  • Snatch or Cleans from High Block
  • Snatch or Clean High Pulls from Hang or Blocks
Incorrect Power Position: An athlete may finish in a way that looks like this if the hips rose faster than the shoulders and/or when hips are sent forward rather than up.

Incorrect Power Position: An athlete may finish in a way that looks like this if the hips rose faster than the shoulders and/or when hips are sent forward rather than up.

Incorrect Power Position: An athlete may get to a position similar to this if the athlete attempts to lift around the knees and elevate the torso too quickly.

Incorrect Power Position: An athlete may get to a position similar to this if the athlete attempts to lift around the knees and elevate the torso too quickly.

[A side note: I do not coach hip contact. Hip contact is not wrong, I have seen many coaches use this cue effectively. In my experience, I find it leads to athletes sending their hips forward instead of up and often takes away from their leg drive. I instead focus on the positions leading to the power position and through extension, and the brush happens naturally.]